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Dating

Dating traditionally is a term to describe two people participating in activities together in order to get to know each other and determine suitability for a more intimate relationship or marriage.

Increasingly, however, it is more of a term that people use to describe a relationship (often but not always involving sexual relations) as having no emotional attachment. A person can be ‘dating’ several people at once.

In this article, we’re going to look at some of the more common terms used to describe dating.

One term that used to be pretty much synonymous with it is courtship – an older (although still practiced in some cultures) version of dating, in which there are usually chaperones, and the meeting itself is typically arranged by a third party (relatives of the couple, generally).

Third parties (although not necessarily family, it’s often through a dating service or friends) can set up ‘blind dates’ in which the two people involved do not previously know each other.

Another activity is ‘speed dating’ in which a group of people come together, and, through a fairly structured method, are systematically paired with each other for a short period of time in order to see if any of the participants make a connection.

Another term widely used is ‘online dating.’ This is where people meet typically through signing up at a third party website and answering a series of questions designed to match people that will be hopefully compatible. This is becoming more and more popular, and the screening methods are becoming more advanced as well.

Something becoming increasingly popular is ‘virtual dating’ in which people spend time on a virtual world interacting with each other via ‘avatars’ (their in-game personas) and perhaps at some point actually start dating in the real world.

There’s also a tendency in recent years towards ‘hook-up’ sites, where people can find others who are just interested in one-night stands or sexual relationships with no emotional ties or commitments.

There are a lot of other dating terms, but these are currently some of the more common ones being used. By exploring this category today you can find out a lot more about the various forms dating can take, and all the different nuances and subtopics that can be involved.

http://www.infobarrel.com/Dating

Turning 40

If you’re under 40 years old, click the back button on your browser. Turn around and walk away. DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT read this piece under any circumstances!

Okay, you’ve been warned. I just don’t want my 20-something, 30-something friends to get depressed. Especially those of you who may be 39 and three-quarters years old or something close to that.

You see, when I hit 40 I felt like a car with an expired warranty. Everything (and I do mean, EVERYTHING) started falling apart.

I should know about cars with expired warranties. My first and so far only new car ever was great. It lasted me many years. It came off the lot with new tires, as all new cars do.

The tires had their own warranty, separate of the car’s. The warranty was, ahem, “backed” by the tire manufacturer. I won’t tell you who made the car or the tires.

I will tell you the tires had a 50,000-mile warranty on them. And I swear to you, the minute those tires hit the 50,000-mile mark, they didn’t just go flat, the tread didn’t just wear out on them, nothing like that. Oh, no.

http://www.infobarrel.com/Turning_40

Single Parent Survival Kit

I do not believe that anybody would choose to be a single parent. There are a few reasons I can think of, death of spouse, divorce or abandonment. If possible nobody wants that to happen to them. However, it has happened. There’s nothing that can be done to change what has past.

I have to repeat this again. Remember that there is nothing and nothing can turn back the hands of time. Learn to accept the facts. (I’m sorry if the truth hurts but it is what it is) You have only 2 choices.

Choice #1: Keep on thinking about how unfortunate you are, keep on looking back and grief about what you should have done or what you shouldn’t have done. (YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T CHANGE A THING.)

Choice #2: Learn to accept the truth, be strong, be courageous and move on with life together with your kid/kids. We can only move on with time, stop looking on the rear mirror of life.

Be strong for your children for they are one of your greatest sources of PURPOSE to move on. When you have a define purpose in life, you will work hard to provide for your children.

Do remember you are not fighting this battle alone. You still have so many other people around you, who are willing to give you support and help in any ways. You have your family, your friends, your church support group, internet support forums and most importantly, your lovely children.

Time heals all wounds. However, you are in control of your life and you have the final say on how fast you would like to recover from this major life crisis. The time to grief is a must, however, do not take too long. Set a date to move on or for rebirth.

Once you accepted where you are now, please pamper yourself to a good treat in celebration of a new life born. There are countless of things you still can do. Go write a list of things you would love to share with your kids and family. You still can organize family trips to picnics or to the beach. Start making new friends and who knows what could happen next.

Remember you are the Master of your life. Setbacks are meant to make you stronger and treasure the things you have overlooked in life. Be courageous and strong. There is nothing you cannot do or overcome. What is stopping you now?

http://www.whatisstoppingyounow.com

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Eulogy Mother Mummy Sacrifice Roles of a Mother Challenges of Marriage Family

A mother is not just one who gives birth to a child; rather a mother is one who also cares for a child, protects, teaches, nurtures and help channel the child in the path destined by the maker. My mother played this role and many more. She was a mother, a confidant, sister and a great friend.

She gave birth to me while she was still in school, married to a man, my father then an army officer who was later detained after a civil war for some years. When wives of the detainees left their husbands based on uncertainties, my mother stood by her husband, visiting him in prison, hopeful he would be released. Indeed he was released but dismissed. A lady who came from a wealthy home but married a man who did not have much to offer her had to face the challenges of lack in marriage. She had to fend for her growing family which she did sacrificially. She was a woman who put her family first and laboured so much to ensure her children had the basics and more.

We may not have had opportunities to go on family vacations or had fun like visiting amusement parks and watching movies in cinemas but we never went hungry. Mummy ensured there were food, clothing and education. I went through the university with the assurance that she would go to any length even if it meant selling all she had. She sacrificed so much that I dreamt of the days I would spoil her silly. I imagined sponsoring her trips to some countries, buying her a car, clothes, name it. Alas, death has truncated my dream.

Time I hear heals but one certainly would not forget. Since the day she left, I would want to reach out to her; alas she is unavailable; she is gone. It is not for a day or a month or even a year. She is gone forever, leaving strong memories behind.

I remember when I was in secondary school, a Saturday before the Monday I was to take my final year mathematics exam, I was sick. I did not want to take any anti-malarial because I feared it might knock me out and then I would not take my exam. So I did not want to tell anyone but my mother as observant as she was found out. She prayed for me. Believe it or not, I had been praying but her prayer did the trick. I was healed that night. I went into the examination hall hale and hearty.

As people commiserated with us, we were stunned at the number of lives she had touched. She was qualified with numerous adjectives that it dawned on me that my mother gave her all not just to her family but also to those she met in her journey of life.

Agility was her second name! She was such great organizer that her friends and relatives would solicit her help in planning and managing events. She was so outstanding in whatever she did I fear her shoes would never be my size no matter how hard I try. However, I believe she has left a legacy in me and my siblings.

She taught me a lot of things about life which really prepared me to face the world when I left home. Even now, though she is gone, I still remember and would practice all the things she has taught and I believe she would be proud of me as she looks on me from where she is.

Mum, indeed you live on.

 

http://www.helium.com/items/1330782-eulogy-mother-mummy-sacrifice-roles-of-a-mother-challenges-of-marriage-family

What to Talk About Before Getting Married

Getting married will be one of the happiest, most exciting times in your life. You love your partner and feel like you know everything about them. But have you talked about some of the most important topics? Check this list and find out!

1. Finances

Money is cited as the number one reason for divorce. Before getting married, you need to discuss who will be in charge of the finances. Will you get a joint bank account? Will you also have separate accounts? Do both of you have previous debt? How will it be paid? Do you need to start saving for a house? Kids? Retirement? There are many aspects to finances that you will need to discuss before the big day.

2. Household chores

Women often say that they do all the housework and wish their husbands would contribute more. This problem can easily be solved if this is something you discuss in advance. Who will do the dishes? Clean the bathrooms? Should you share chores? Alternate weeks? Having a plan will keep your house in order and keep both parties happy.

3. Religion

Religion can be an important aspect in many people’s lives. It determines how you spend your Sundays, your holidays, and whether your children will be baptized or circumcised. Are you and your partner the same religion? If you are different religions, will you combine holiday traditions? How large of a role do you want it to play in your lives? How do you want your children to take part in your religion? Many family events are centered around religion so these are questions you should definitely discuss.

4. Cheating

Of course when you are getting married, the last thing you want to think about is your spouse cheating on you. But there is one very important question here- what do you consider cheating? It has been estimated that approximately half of all divorces are due to infidelity. Having a clear definition of cheating eliminates any gray area and each person will know where to draw the line.

5. Where you see yourself 5 and 10 years from now

You need to be sure that the life you both want can be accomplished with your being together. Where do you want to live? Do you want children, and how soon? Will you both work full time? Are you interested in going back to school? When do you want to retire and with how much money? Having your lives on the same track and sharing goals is one key to a long, happy future.

Communication in marriage is essential. If you cannot communicate with your spouse, many problems are sure to arise. It is best to plan ahead and be prepared for what is coming. If you are able to discuss things calmly and openly, you are on your way to a successful marriage!

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Stop and Twirl: Honoring Joyful Moments with Happiness

My son Ben, 30, has schizophrenia. That was not an easy change to accept, believe me. Our original hopes and dreams for his life have been altered considerably, yet once we got to a place of acceptance (through support, education, and hope), it has become an essential part of our family’s winding road to notice and accept the moments that are, in their simplicity, quite miraculous.

My final trip in June was to the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) National Convention in Seattle, where I presented a workshop about using personal stories to inspire and help create change. The five-day event was filled with opportunities to hear others’ stories – of success, but also of heartbreak, frustration, confusion and loss.

Ben has been hospitalized eight times, three of which were considered relapse episodes after treatment was finally established. Right now he is wonderfully stable, in college part-time and employed. A miracle. Every ordinary family moment that others might take for grated is a miracle to me now, especially when I stop to notice. As long as we remember how much worse things could be,instead of thinking of what we have lost.

What are those moments? Going to a movie as a family. Ben remembering his sister’s birthday. Dinner out in a restaurant together. A hug. A good grade in school.

Sure, a year ago Ben was in the middle of a relapse. Sure, it could happen again despite all we are doing to walk by his side with love, discipline and hope. Still, right now it’s a good day. Ben is in treatment, purposeful, clean and sober, and even employed. He is in the bosom of our family (though he pays rent for an apartment that is so lonely he hates to be there), and for today he is stable – and with us.

Yes, indeed, a good day. The "other shoe" isn’t falling today. So I am grateful.

And I’m going to stop and twirl.

I hope you will too.

 

Randye Kaye is a pro voice talent/actress for Swanson, Priceline, NBC, and more. Author of “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” called a “must-read” by Publishers Weekly. Next up: “Happier Made Simple” …

Randye Kaye’s author pageAuthor’s Blog

How To Wreck Your Marriage

Marriages fail for any number of reasons, and it’s rarely a one-sided endeavor. However, statistically speaking, it is the wife who files for divorce about 75 percent of the time. Now this study, conducted by AARP, discusses many possible reasons for the lopsidedness, and truly every situation is unique. However, I have seen marriages end where the husband is left shocked, completely blind-sided that this was a possibility. I’ve seen situations where the guy never had a clue that his behavior would ultimately destroy his marriage, because in his mind, everything was perfect. Considering this, I have to wonder if there aren’t many other men existing in this same state of marital bliss, yet heading for an avoidable train wreck. So in this article, I present to you ways you may be wrecking your marriage without even knowing it. (With apologies to all the wonderful, amazing men out there – I’ll get to you next time). And before you go any further, let me send out a disclaimer that it’s not always the man’s fault (ladies, I’ll get t0 you next time too). But this one’s for the guys. The guys who are spiraling headlong towards divorce court like an asteroid speeding at the sun., and they don’t even realize it. 

 

http://www.infobarrel.com/How_To_Wreck_Your_Marriage

The True Effects of Divorce

Divorce is known as the dissolution of marriage or the termination of a marital union. This also includes the cancellation of the legal duties and responsibilities of marriage. In layman’s term, this is basically the separation of two people on several different levels.

Entering the process of divorce can be a stressful event in one’s family. Both parties undergo a series of changes that can be devastating to the both of them. Parties may be bitter, or they may feel rejected and cheated. A lot of new arrangements are set in the process of divorce. There is the so-called economic arrangement and the co-parental arrangement that can both add tension to the parties involved.

Many changes happen during divorce. Psychologically, the individuals involved would need to get use to not having the other person around. This is much more difficult in long term marriages since they are obliged to adapt to the fact that the person that they used to be with, on a daily basis, is now not present in their life anymore. Socially, due to being uncomfortable to some people, they may now give up some friends and in turn make new ones. Aside from the stated changes, there are also economical changes that divorced couples also take into consideration. They must split their properties and establish separate households. Husbands may even be required to pay child support, or wives, to some extent.

As stressful as it may seem, divorce is a common process that is undergone by a lot of couples right now. This brings a lot of anxiety and tension to both parties. So before giving yourself a hard time, always think twice.

Dennis Gac is widely known as “The World’s premier fathers rights Consultant!” But why would you care? Well, I’ll tell you if you rush over to his site… I think you’ll come to your own conclusion that he “IS” the real deal! Experience someone who works and thinks outside the box for you! Read what others have to say at…. http://www.fathershelphotline.com.

Can marriage be saved?

Foes of Rick Santorum “Santorum” redirects here. For other uses, see Santorum (disambiguation).

Richard John Santorum (born May 10, 1958) is a former United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  say that same-sex marriage is destroying the institution, they’re flying against the data–unless by “destroy” they mean “increase the rate of.”

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Can marriage be saved?-a0151013866

Tween/TeenLit: Split in Two: Keeping It Together When Your Parents Live Apart Helps Kids Adjust to Two Homes

 

My fondest wish when I was a kid was that my parents would divorce. Naively, I believed that I would live with my father.

The reality, back in the day, was that if my parents did divorce, my brothers and I would end up with our mother (who didn’t particularly enjoy motherhood). We all got out of the house in our late teens, and our parents stayed marry ‘til death did they part (they were in their 80s).

Author Karen Buscemi’s book, Split in Two: Keeping It Together When Your Parents Live Apart, deals with the realities of being the kid shared by two former mates.

In addition to having two “homes,” kids from split homes have to spend (waste) time traveling between parents, lose time with their friends, may have two different bedrooms but not what they need when they need it (“oh, shoot, I left it at the other house”), and experience chaotic schedules, often affected by things that no one could have foreseen or controlled.

Having voluntarily spent my time in two homes—one in Louisiana and one in Mississippi—up until five years ago, I can attest to that feeling of waking up and wondering where you are, which I still experience although I’m living in one place.

Being a tween or teen, undergoing the pressures of school and peers, and dealing with your own hormonal changes must increase that confusion tenfold (at least). Imagine what it must be like to feel your life has been reduced to moments between traveling back and forth, and it’s not something you caused or can control.

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Two words describe Bob Etier: “female” and “weird.” Like many freelance writers, there’s something about her that isn’t quite right. Read her stuff and find out what.

Bob Etier’s author pageAuthor’s Blog